Wednesday, April 23, 2014

Wednesday Weekly # 30

Welcome to the Wednesday Weekly, your weekly dose of links to Egyptology news, articles, blogs, events and more!


FT MAGAZINE


By Peter Aspden:


Fit for a king: Tutankhamun’s replica burial chamber

http://www.ft.com/cms/s/2/2613b3e2-c5df-11e3-a7d4-00144feabdc0.html#axzz2z9TpGoA7

THE CAIRO POST


By Rany Mostafa:


Ancient Egyptian tomb discovered in Giza

http://thecairopost.com/news/106816/news/ancient-egyptian-tomb-discovered-in-giza

AHRAM ONLINE

Two Saiti tombs unearthed near Egypt's Minya

http://english.ahram.org.eg/NewsContent/9/40/99433/Heritage/Ancient-Egypt/Two-Saiti-tombs-unearthed-near-Egypts-Minya.aspx

Egyptians celebrate ancient festival of Sham El-Nessim
http://english.ahram.org.eg/NewsContent/1/64/99540/Egypt/Politics-/Egyptians-celebrate-ancient-festival-of-Sham-ElNes.aspx

HAIR AND DEATH IN ANCIENT EGYPT

by María Rosa Valdesogo:


Re and Geb also place Isis and Nephtys at both ends of the Egyptian mummy.
http://hairanddeathinancientegypt.com/2014/04/22/re-and-geb-also-place-isis-and-nephtys-at-both-ends-of-the-egyptian-mummy/

THE ANCIENT WORLD ONLINE

EMINA: Egyptian Mummies in North America
http://ancientworldonline.blogspot.nl/2014/04/emina-egyptian-mummies-in-north-america.html

Open Access Publications: Giza Occasional Papers
http://ancientworldonline.blogspot.nl/2009/08/blog-post.html

LUXOR TIMES

New blogentry:


Two 26th Dynasty tombs were discovered in old city of Per Medjet
http://luxortimesmagazine.blogspot.nl/2014/04/two-26th-dynasty-tombs-were-discovered.html

THE EGYPTIAN HISTORY PODCAST

Episode XXVII: A Walk in the Desert

Montuhotep II [Part I]
http://egyptianhistory.libsyn.com/episode-xxvii-a-walk-in-the-desert

IN THE ARTIFACT LAB

By Molly Gleeson:

Investigating the shabti box coating
http://www.penn.museum/sites/artifactlab/2014/04/18/investigating-the-shabti-box-coating/

EM HOTEP

Sarah Korcz – A New Interview with Jean-Pierre Houdin
http://emhotep.net/2014/04/19/structures/pyramids-structures/sarah-korcz-a-new-interview-with-jean-pierre-houdin/

AERA

New blogpost:

Discovering very old archaeology…after eating sweets on site
http://www.aeraweb.org/blog/discovering-archaeology-after-eating-sweets-on-site/

AL-AHRAM WEEKLY

Voyage of the obelisk
http://weekly.ahram.org.eg/News/5970/23/Voyage-of-the-obelisk.aspx

UCL MUSEUMS & COLLECTIONS BLOG

By Edmund Connolly:

Egypt on the Stage: A Tale of two Queens
http://blogs.ucl.ac.uk/museums/2014/04/20/egypt-on-the-stage-a-tale-of-two-queens/

GEBEL EL SILSILA SURVEY PROJECT

Seven weeks in - Stela of Amenhotep IV, Easter daredevils and Sham el Nessim
http://gebelelsilsilaepigraphicsurveyproject.blogspot.nl/2014/04/seven-weeks-in-stela-of-amenhotep-iv.html

ANCIENT EGYPT AND A MAPLE LEAF

New posts by Thomas H. Greiner:


Luxor, ancient Thebes: Is it all hassle or does it bedazzle?
http://thomasgreiner.com/2014/04/21/luxor-ancient-thebes-is-it-all-hassle-or-does-it-bedazzle/

PAST HORIZONS

UNWRAPPING ANCIENT EGYPT
http://www.pasthorizonspr.com/index.php/archives/04/2014/unwrapping-ancient-egypt

ACROSS BORDERS

By Elke Schuster:


First-hand experience with New Kingdom pottery
http://acrossborders.oeaw.ac.at/first-hand-experience-with-new-kingdom-pottery/

AMARA WEST PROJECT BLOG

By Tomomi Fushiya (archaeologist) and Neal Spencer (British Museum):

Presenting Amara West to the community and visitors
http://blog.amarawest.britishmuseum.org/2014/04/18/presenting-amara-west-to-the-community-and-visitors/

FACES & VOICES

Papyri, private collectors and academics: why the wife of Jesus and Sappho matter
http://facesandvoices.wordpress.com/2014/04/17/papyri-private-collectors-and-academics-why-the-wife-of-jesus-and-sappho-matter/

EL KURRU: A ROYAL CITY OF ANCIENT KUSH

End-of-the-season: The City Wall
http://elkurrukush.blogspot.nl/2014/04/end-of-season-city-wall.html

End-of-the-season: The Temple
http://elkurrukush.blogspot.nl/2014/04/end-of-season-temple.html

End-of-the-season: The Pyramid
http://elkurrukush.blogspot.nl/2014/04/end-of-season-pyramid.html

End-of-the-season: Objects
http://elkurrukush.blogspot.nl/2014/04/end-of-season-objects.html

End-of-the-season: Final thoughts
http://elkurrukush.blogspot.nl/2014/04/end-of-season-final-thoughts.html

EES DELTA SURVEY

Weather, work, a visit by Essam Nagy, and gratuitous cat No.5
http://deltasurvey.tumblr.com/post/82896674502/weather-work-a-visit-by-essam-nagy-and-gratuitous

Planning Late Period buildings in the wind!
http://deltasurvey.tumblr.com/post/83302243398/planning-late-period-buildings-in-the-wind

Sham er-Nessim at Tell Buweib
http://deltasurvey.tumblr.com/post/83514842758/sham-er-nessim-at-tell-buweib

KELSEY MUSEUM OF ARCHAEOLOGY

Staff Favorite
https://kelseymuseum.wordpress.com/2014/04/22/staff-favorite/

DIANABUJA'S BLOG: AFRICA, THE MIDDLE EAST, AGRICULTURE, HISTORY AND CULTURE

Coptic Easter and A Feast in Rural Egypt – Recipes Included
http://dianabuja.wordpress.com/2014/04/18/coptic-easter-and-a-feast-in-rural-egypt-recipes-included/

LIVESCIENCE

By Owen Jarus:

Body Slam This! Ancient Wrestling Match Was Fixed
http://www.livescience.com/44867-ancient-wrestling-match-was-fixed.html

Tuesday, April 22, 2014

Voyage of the obelisk

A new exhibition is revisiting the journey of the ancient Egyptian obelisk from Luxor to the Place de la Concorde in Paris, writes David Tresilian

The ancient Egyptian obelisks that today decorate many European cities, among them Paris and London, were mostly transported during the nineteenth century when the desirability of preserving ancient sites was less well appreciated than it is today and when Egypt’s rulers, not always particularly interested in the country’s heritage, found themselves casting round for suitable gifts to press upon their European neighbours.

As a result, while at the beginning of the nineteenth century only Rome, among European cities, had a significant population of obelisks, most of them having been transported by the Romans in antiquity, by the century’s end London and Paris each boasted particularly fine examples. The London obelisk, carved during the reign of the 18th Dynasty pharaoh Tuthmosis III, was re-erected on the Thames embankment in 1878, and the Paris one, dating from the reign of the 19th Dynasty pharaoh Ramses II, was set up in the more splendid location of the Place de la Concorde in 1836.

New York gained its obelisk in 1881, when the Egyptian khedive, surrendering to arguments that if Paris and London were to have obelisks than New York should have one too, presented the twin of the 18th Dynasty London obelisk to the city. It now stands in New York’s Central Park a short distance away from the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

The idea of presenting obelisks first to European countries and then to the United States appealed to successive Egyptian rulers because these objects, given as gifts to the cities concerned, were as emblematic of Egypt as the Great Pyramids or the Sphinx at Giza and they had the advantage of being considerably more portable.

Monday, April 21, 2014

Two Saiti tombs unearthed near Egypt's Minya

Two 26th Dynasty tombs have been discovered at Al-Bahnasa archaeological site in Middle Egypt, containing mummies, coins and even mummified fish

Ahram Online , Sunday 20 Apr 2014

A Spanish-Egyptian team has uncovered two 26th Dynasty tombs during excavation work at Al-Bahnasa archaeological site in Minya.

Al-Bahnasa was known in the ancient Egyptian era as the town of Pr-Medjet, developing in the Graeco-Roman period to be the city of Oxyrhynchus.

According to a statement by the Ministry of Antiquities, the first tomb belongs to a scribe whose his name is not yet identified but was important, having influence on Egypt’s cultural sphere. The tomb houses some of his funerary collection. A bronze inkwell and two small bamboo pens were found beside the deceased’s mummy, which is in a very good state of preservation.
Photocredit: Ahram Online

Ali El-Asfar, head of the Ancient Egyptian Antiquities Sector at the Ministry of Antiquities, explained that a large number of mummified fishes were also unearthed inside the tomb as well as the lid of a canopic jar. Among the fishes is one representing the symbol of the city. “It is the first time to find stuffed or mummified fishes inside a tomb,” said El-Asfar.

The second tomb, said Mohamed Ibrahim, minister of antiquities, belongs to a priest who was the head of a family many of whose members were priests in the Osirion Temple. This temple was uncovered recently two kilometres west of the tomb.

A large collection of stone sarcophagi, which some are broken, was found along with canopic jars carved in alabaster and bearing hieroglyphic texts as well as a collection of bronze Osirian statuettes. A collection of bronze coins was found inside the second tomb.

The large number of coins reveals that the Saiiti era was one of Egypt’s flourishing periods. Osireion statues and bronze coins dating back to the 26th Dynasty were also found in the tomb.

Joseph Padro, head of the Spanish mission, said: “The Spanish mission of Barcelona University has been working in Egypt in cooperation with the Ministry of Antiquities since 1992. During this period, many discoveries were made and this discovery comes as a reward for excavation work this season.”

Source: http://english.ahram.org.eg/NewsContent/9/40/99433/Heritage/Ancient-Egypt/Two-Saiti-tombs-unearthed-near-Egypts-Minya.aspx

Sunday, April 20, 2014

Museum Pieces - Head of Nectanebo II


Head of Nectanebo II

Egyptian, Late Period, Dynasty 30, reign of Nectanebo II, 362–343 B.C.

DIMENSIONS
height x width x depth 31 x 24.5 x 24 cm (11 13/16 x 9 5/8 x 9 7/16 in.)

MEDIUM OR TECHNIQUE
Granodiorite

CLASSIFICATION
Sculpture

ACCESSION NUMBER
2000.637

ON VIEW
Egypt: Late Period Gallery - 216

This superb portrait of Egypt’s last native pharaoh is the product of three thousand years’ expertise in carving hard stone. The volumes of his helmet-shaped crown — the Blue Crown, or khepresh, are sleek and streamlined, almost aerodynamic. The artist reveled in the mottled texture of the stone, and polished it to a glistening sheen in a painstaking process reserved for the most important statues. 

Nectanebo II was known as the favorite of the gods, renowned for his piety, devotion to the sacred animal cults, lavish gifts of land, restoration of cult statues, and founding of new temples. Thirty sites from the Delta to Elephantine and as far west as Siwa attest to his extraordinary building activity: fourteen completely new structures plus extensions to existing sanctuaries and gifts of temple furniture. Such expenditures would have been remarkable at any time but were particularly so when the country was under constant threat of invasion from the Persians. 

In 343 B.C. Nectanebo II was defeated by the Persians. Nothing is known of his death. Legend has it that he escaped to Macedonia. A skilled magician, he appeared to Queen Olympias in her bedchamber disguised as her husband Philip, and sired the future Alexander the Great. It is certain that he was honored under the Ptolemies, for whom he provided an ideal role model as pharaoh. A cult that worshipped Nectanebo II as a divine falcon, the epitome of kingship, persisted at least until the reign of Ptolemy IV.

Source: http://www.mfa.org/collections/object/head-of-nectanebo-ii-272158

Wednesday, April 16, 2014

Wednesday Weekly # 29

Welcome to the Wednesday Weekly, your weekly dose of links to Egyptology news, articles, blogs, events and more!


THE JERUSALEM POST


3,300-year-old Egyptian coffin found in Jezreel Valley

http://www.jpost.com/National-News/3300-year-old-Egyptian-coffin-found-in-Jezreel-Valley-347980

HAIR AND DEATH IN ANCIENT EGYPT

by María Rosa Valdesogo:


The two Mourners Isis and Nephtys in the Egyptian Coffins of XIII Dynasty.

http://hairanddeathinancientegypt.com/2014/04/08/the-two-mourners-isis-and-nephtys-in-the-egyptian-coffins-of-xiii-dynasty/

Nut places the two mourners in some coffins of the XII Dynasty.
http://hairanddeathinancientegypt.com/2014/04/15/nut-places-the-two-mourners-in-some-coffins-of-the-xii-dynasty/

EGYPT AT THE MANCHESTER MUSEUM

Texts in Translation #13: The Stela of Sobek-khu (Acc. no. 3306)

http://egyptmanchester.wordpress.com/2014/04/10/texts-in-translation-13-the-stela-of-sobek-khu-acc-no-3306/

The Inspiration of Shabtis – an Artist’s Perspective
http://egyptmanchester.wordpress.com/2014/04/14/the-inspiration-of-shabtis-an-artists-perspective/

ARCHAEOLOGY

Messengers to the Gods

http://www.archaeology.org/issues/124-1403/features/1724-egypt-animal-mummies-brooklyn-museum

AHRAM ONLINE

By Nevine El-Aref:


Egyptian police confiscate three mummies from smuggling gang
http://english.ahram.org.eg/NewsContent/9/40/98836/Heritage/Ancient-Egypt/Egyptian-police-confiscate-three-mummies-from-smug.aspx

Free admission to all of Egypt's archaeological sites, 18 & 19 April
http://english.ahram.org.eg/NewsContent/9/40/99136/Heritage/Ancient-Egypt/Free-admission-to-all-of-Egypts-archaeological-sit.aspx

By Amer Sultan:

Briton fined £500 by UK court for attempted sale of smuggled Egypt antiquities
http://english.ahram.org.eg/NewsContent/9/40/99060/Heritage/Ancient-Egypt/Briton-fined-%C2%A3-by-UK-court-for-attempted-sale-of-s.aspx

AL-AHRAM WEEKLY

By Nevine El-Aref:


Replica for Tutankhamun
http://weekly.ahram.org.eg/News/5875/47/Replica-for-Tutankhamun.aspx

EGYPTOLOGY NEWS

Amarna, Spring Season 2014, second report from Barry Kemp

http://egyptology.blogspot.nl/2014/04/amarna-spring-season-2014-second-report.html

DAILY MAIL

By Fiona Macrae:


Unravelled after 3,000 years, the secrets of the singing mummy: CT scans peer through the burial case and bandages to reveal life of the person hidden inside
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2600526/CT-scan-reveals-spatula-lodged-inside-skull-2-600-year-old-mummy-used-scoop-brains.html?ITO=1490&ns_mchannel=rss&ns_campaign=1490

NAUTILUS

BY ROSE EVELETH:

The Curse of the Unlucky Mummy
http://nautil.us/issue/12/feedback/the-curse-of-the-unlucky-mummy

COMPANY OF IMAGES

Company of Images: Modelling the ancient Egyptian imaginary world of the Middle Bronze Age

International Conference: 18-20 September 2014: Institute of Archaeology, University College, London

The purpose of this conference is to explore the fertile imaginary world of Middle Bronze Age Egypt (2000-1500BC) through its material culture and the archaeological sources from which such material is recovered.  
http://www.companyofimages.com/

LUXOR TIMES

New blogentries:

Two reliefs are reported missing or maybe stolen from Luxor temple.
http://luxortimesmagazine.blogspot.nl/2014/04/two-reliefs-are-reported-missing-or.html

Exclusive photos of the stolen antiquities, Facts on Luxor Temple theft including a statement from Dr. Raymond Johnson
http://luxortimesmagazine.blogspot.nl/2014/04/exclusive-photos-of-stolen-antiquities.html

THE ANCIENT WORLD ONLINE

Heidelberger historische Bestände: Ägyptologische Literatur – digital
http://ancientworldonline.blogspot.nl/2014/04/heidelberger-historische-bestande.html

EGYPT CENTRE, SWANSEA

Something I don’t know much about: Predynastic Pottery
http://egyptcentre.blogspot.nl/2014/04/something-i-dont-know-much-about.html

TETISHERI

New Egyptology book releases: March 2014
http://www.tetisheri.co.uk/3/post/2014/04/new-egyptology-book-releases-march-2014.html

UCL MUSEUMS & COLLECTIONS BLOG

New blogentry:

Pottery Project guest Blog: Pottery on the move.
http://blogs.ucl.ac.uk/museums/2014/04/15/pottery-project-guest-blog-pottery-on-the-move/

ANCIENT EGYPT AND A MAPLE LEAF

New posts by Thomas H. Greiner:

Egypt: Here I come!
http://thomasgreiner.com/2014/04/13/egypt-here-i-come/

What’s the Buzz at Giza?
http://thomasgreiner.com/2014/04/15/whats-the-buzz-at-giza/

ANCIENT EGYPTIAN ANIMAL BIO BANK

Wow, what a week!
http://ancientegyptbiobank.wordpress.com/2014/04/14/wow-what-a-week/

PAST HORIZONS

HEART DISEASE FOUND IN FIVE AMARA WEST SKELETONS
http://www.pasthorizonspr.com/index.php/archives/04/2014/heart-disease-found-in-five-amara-west-skeletons

ACROSS BORDERS

By Julia Budka:

Post-excavation working steps in Vienna
http://acrossborders.oeaw.ac.at/post-excavation-working-steps-in-vienna/

Categories of finds from Sai, New Kingdom town – some preliminary numbers
http://acrossborders.oeaw.ac.at/categories-of-finds-from-sai-new-kingdom-town-some-preliminary-numbers/

THE BRITISH MUSEUM

Assistant Project Curator: Amara West Ceramics

The Department of Ancient Egypt and Sudan are recruiting for an Assistant Project Curator who will support the Amara West Research Project. The successful applicant will take responsibility for documenting, analysing and researching ceramic assemblages from the site. You will work closely with the Project Director, Project Curator and other researchers and scientists.
https://atsv7.wcn.co.uk/search_engine/jobs.cgi?SID=amNvZGU9MTQxMjcxMCZ2dF90ZW1wbGF0ZT02NzImb3duZXI9NTAyNzczNSZvd25lcnR5cGU9ZmFpciZicmFuZF9pZD0wJnJlcXNpZz0xMzk3NTYwNDI3LWJlYWE0ZTY5MGIzZmQ5ZGZhMzMyYzgxYTQxYzhmNGM5NzU0NzlhYmY=

THE SOCIETY FOR THE STUDY OF ANCIENT EGYPT

One Great Day: Two Great Speakers...
Excavations at Amarna
Barry Kemp
What Killed Tutankhamun?
Chris Naunton, EES 

Saturday 12 July 2014
at 10.30 am

Admission to this event is by ticket only: 

£7.00 each (see Homepage for booking details)
http://www.ssae.org.uk/events-2010.htm

EES DELTA SURVEY

Friday update from Tell Buweib
http://deltasurvey.tumblr.com/post/82372805892/friday-update-from-tell-buweib

Casemate, flooded fields and bee-eaters
http://deltasurvey.tumblr.com/post/82688083254/casemate-flooded-fields-and-bee-eaters

EES TELL MUTUBIS SURVEY 

Return to the site!
http://tellmutubis.tumblr.com/post/81283939915/return-to-the-site


Sunday, April 13, 2014

Unravelled after 3,000 years, the secrets of the singing mummy

By Fiona Macrae

Her body has lain undisturbed for almost 3,000 years.

Now, thanks to modern technology, the secrets of Tamut’s life are being unwrapped without upsetting her peace.

Using a CT scanner in London hospitals, experts from the British Museum peered through the intricately decorated burial case and the multiple layers of linen bandages to the person hidden inside.

The electronic excavation showed Tamut to have received the most lavish level of mummification, with amulets and other mystical jewels buried with her. 

These include artificial eyes, to allow her to see in the afterlife, thin plates of gold or another precious metal on her finger and toe nails and metal plates designed to magically heal the wounds left by the embalmer.

Some of the amulets were placed on her body – others were put inside, beside her vital organs.

Her hair was short, likely because she wore a wig, and examination of her pelvis suggests she was at least 35 when she died. The cause of death is unknown – but the scans provide a tantalising clue.

They show a large part of the femoral artery in her upper thigh to be clogged with fat, a piece of which could have broken off and triggered a heart attack or a stroke.

Friday, April 11, 2014

Messengers to the Gods

During a turbulent period in ancient Egypt, common people turned to animal mummies to petition the gods, inspiring the rise of a massive religious industry

For decades, 30 boxes lay forgotten in the storage vaults of the Brooklyn Museum’s Egyptology department. The contents had not been catalogued, or even seen, since the 1930s and 40s, when they were purchased from the New-York Historical Society. But in 2009, curatorial assistant Kathy Zurek-Doule finally opened the boxes. Lying nestled inside each one was an elaborately wrapped mummy in the shape of an animal. Ibises, hawks, cats, dogs, snakes, and even a shrew were all represented in the collection, which had been amassed by a wealthy New York businessman in the mid-nineteenth century. Faced with an unexpected trove of objects unlike any other the museum has, Egyptology curator Edward Bleiberg and his team embarked on a comprehensive study of the mummies. The rediscovered objects gave Bleiberg the chance to investigate a question that has puzzled archaeologists ever since they first realized that vast animal cemeteries along the Nile hold millions of mummies: Why did the ancient Egyptians invest so much in the afterlife of creatures?

Unlike Greeks and Romans, ancient Egyptians believed animals possess a soul, or ba, just as humans do. “We forget how significant it is to ascribe a soul to an animal,” says Bleiberg. “For ancient Egyptians, animals were both physical and spiritual beings.” In fact, the ancient Egyptian language had no word for “animal” as a separate category until the spread of Christianity. Animal cults flourished outside the established state temples for much of Egyptian history and animals played a critical role in Egypt’s spiritual life. The gods themselves sometimes took animal form. Horus, the patron god of Egypt, was often portrayed with the head of a hawk; Thoth, the scribe god, was represented as an ibis or a baboon; and the fertility goddess Hathor was depicted as a cow. Even the pharaohs revered animals, and at least a few royal pets were mummified. In 1400 B.C., the pharaoh Amenhotep II went to the afterlife accompanied by his hunting dog, and a decade later his heir Thutmose IV was buried with a royal cat.