Wednesday, July 30, 2014

Wednesday Weekly # 44

Welcome to the Wednesday Weekly, your weekly dose of links to Egyptology news, articles, blogs, events and more!

The Wednesday Weekly will take a short vacation and will be back in September with a full up to date new edition. 

In the meanwhile keep checking my blog for the latest Egyptology news.

So have a wonderful summer and see you all in September! 

LIVESCIENCE

New article by Owen Jarus:


Egyptian Carving Defaced by King Tut's Possible Father Discovered

http://www.livescience.com/46978-egyptian-carving-discovered.html

AHRAM ONLINE


By Nevine El-Aref:


Stolen 18th dynasty relief returns from Germany

http://english.ahram.org.eg/NewsContent/9/40/106876/Heritage/Ancient-Egypt/Stolen-th-dynasty-relief-returns-from-Germany.aspx

THE ANCIENT WORLD ONLINE

Open Access Journal: Prazské egyptologické studie PES
http://ancientworldonline.blogspot.nl/2009/10/open-access-journal-prazske.html

Meketre: an online repository for middle kingdom scenes
http://ancientworldonline.blogspot.nl/2012/05/meketre-online-repository-for-middle.html

Tombes de Deir el Medina: Couverture photographique
http://ancientworldonline.blogspot.nl/2014/07/tombes-de-deir-el-medina-couverture.html

IN THE ARTIFACT LAB

New post by Molly Gleeson:

Out with the old, in with the new
http://www.penn.museum/sites/artifactlab/2014/07/26/out-with-the-old-in-with-the-new/

HAIR AND DEATH IN ANCIENT EGYPT

by María Rosa Valdesogo:


The Beauty of Hair in Ancient Egypt.
http://hairanddeathinancientegypt.com/2014/07/24/the-beauty-of-hair-in-ancient-egypt/

EGYPT CENTRE, SWANSEA

Animal mummies, Jasmine Day, Alex the Cat, and our poor croc.
http://egyptcentre.blogspot.nl/2014/07/animal-mummies-jasmine-day-alex-cat-and.html

THE EGYPTIAN HISTORY PODCAST

Episode 32: The Repeating of Births

Amenemhat I (Part I - Legitimacy)
http://egyptianhistory.libsyn.com/episode-32-the-repeating-of-births

ANCIENT EGYPT AND A MAPLE LEAF

New post by Thomas H. Greiner:

Help Egypt and its Antiquities: Positive Work towards Protecting Cultural Heritage
http://thomasgreiner.com/2014/07/28/help-egypt-and-its-antiquities-positive-work-towards-protecting-cultural-heritage/

AL-AHRAM WEEKLY

By David Tresilian:

Egypt’s heritage crisis
http://weekly.ahram.org.eg/News/6818/32/Egypt%E2%80%99s-heritage-crisis.aspx

ACROSSBORDERS

New post by Julia Budka:

A possible foundation deposit at SAV1 West?
http://acrossborders.oeaw.ac.at/a-possible-foundation-deposit-at-sav1-west/

THE GLEN DASH FOUNDATION BLOG

Video: How the Egyptians May Have Aligned the Pyramids with True North Using the Sun
http://glendash.com/blog/2014/07/27/video-how-the-egyptians-may-have-aligned-the-pyramids-with-true-north-using-the-sun/

KELSEY MUSEUM OF ARCHAEOLOGY

By Catherine Person:

My Favorite Artifact
https://kelseymuseum.wordpress.com/2014/07/24/my-favorite-artifact-2/

SOUTH ASASIF CONSERVATION PROJECT BLOG

Blog Post 7: The Eye of Osiris
http://southasasif.wordpress.com/2014/07/25/blog-post-7-the-eye-of-osiris/

MEDICINE AND MAGIC IN ANCIENT EGYPT

By Sofia Lodi:


Surgical Procedures in Ancient Egypt
http://nefertotsie.blogspot.nl/2014/07/surgical-procedures-in-ancient-egypt.html


Sunday, July 27, 2014

Museum Pieces - Relief fragment with the head of a lady

Relief fragment with the head of a lady


Egyptian 
New Kingdom 
19th Dynasty, early 13th century BC 
Location: Location unknown

Limestone

H 22.6 cm, W 25.6 cm, D 4.4 cm 

This relief fragment probably originates from the wall of a private tomb. It shows a left-turned head of a woman. She wears a wig made of strands and braids, which partially obscure the disc-shaped earrings. To the woman's head a decorated band is wound. At the woman's forehead is a lotus flower. On the eye and brow makeup lines are attached. Under the eye with fine lines are well reproduced tears. Typical for the period of the relief is the representation of wrinkles on the neck.

Kunsthistorisches Museum Vienna, Egyptian - Oriental Collection

Inv.-Nr. AE_INV_73
Provenance: 
1821 purchase by EA Burghart in Egypt

Source: http://bilddatenbank.khm.at/viewArtefact?id=324215&image=AE_INV_73.jpg

Friday, July 25, 2014

Stolen 18th dynasty relief returns from Germany

A painted limestone relief that was stolen and illegally smuggled to Germany during the last century arrives back in Egypt

By Nevine El-Aref , Wednesday 23 Jul 2014

Egypt on Wednesday received from Germany a painted limestone relief that was stolen in the last century from the tomb of 18th dynasty high priest Sobekhotep in the Nobles necropolis on Luxor’s west bank.

Photocredit: Ahram Online
Minister of Antiquities and Heritage Mamdouh El-Damati told Ahram Online that the recovery of the relief started a few months ago when he was Egypt’s cultural attaché in Germany and curators at Bonn University Museum were working hard to organise a temporary exhibition there.

During preparations, a curator at the museum spotted the relief and it was confirmed that it was stolen and had been taken from the 18th dynasty tomb of Sobekhotep, a high priest during the reign of King Tuthmose IV.

The limestone relief is in very good condition. It is 30cm tall and 40cm wide. It depicts two figures of Sobehotep standing and making offerings to deities.

The owners of the relief, a German couple, did not know it was stolen because they brought from a British private collection in 1986 and offered it to Bonn University Museum so it could be displayed at the temporary exhibition.

When they found out it was a stolen and illegally smuggled artefact, said El-Damati, they admitted Egypt’s possession of the relief but asked for it to remain in Germany at the Friderish Museum for Ancient Egyptian Artefacts in Al-Rin area in Bonn. Egypt rejected the demand and said it should be returned under antiquities law 117 of 1983 and its amendment in 2010.

Hence the couple agreed to return the relief after putting it on display for three weeks at the exhibition in Bonn.

Egypt’s embassy in Germany stated on its website that Ambassador Mohamed Hegazy held a celebration on the occasion of returning the artefact and praised the couple for returning it.

Hegazy called on antiquities collectors to return the Egyptian artefacts they own voluntarily to where they belong.

He also called on German authorities to cooperate with Egyptian authorities to protect its cultural and archaeological heritage in accordance with the UNESCO Convention on the Means of Prohibiting and Preventing Illicit Import.

Source: http://english.ahram.org.eg/NewsContent/9/40/106876/Heritage/Ancient-Egypt/Stolen-th-dynasty-relief-returns-from-Germany.aspx

Thursday, July 24, 2014

Egyptian Carving Defaced by King Tut's Possible Father Discovered

By Owen Jarus, Live Science Contributor   |   July 24, 2014

A newly discovered Egyptian carving, which dates back more than 3,300 years, bears the scars of a religious revolution that upended the ancient civilization.

The panel, carved in Nubian Sandstone, was found recently in a tomb at the site of Sedeinga, in modern-day Sudan. It is about 5.8 feet (1.8 meters) tall by 1.3 feet (0.4 m) wide, and was found in two pieces. 

Originally, it adorned the walls of a temple at Sedeinga that was dedicated to Queen Tiye (also spelled Tiyi), who died around 1340 B.C. Several centuries after Tiye's death — and after her temple had fallen into ruin — this panel was reused in a tomb as a bench that held a coffin above the floor.
Credit: Photo by V. Francigny © Sedeinga Mission

Scars of a revolution

Archaeologists found that the god depicted in the carving, Amun, had his face and hieroglyphs hacked out from the panel. The order to deface the carving came from Akhenaten (reign 1353-1336 B.C.), a pharaoh who tried to focus Egyptian religion around the worship of the "Aten," the sun disk. In his fervor, Akhenaten had the name and images of Amun, a key Egyptian god, obliterated throughout all Egypt-controlled territory. This included the ancient land of Nubia, a territory that is now partly in Sudan.

"All the major inscriptions with the name of Amun in Egypt were erased during his reign," archaeology team member Vincent Francigny, a research associate at the American Museum of Natural History in New York, told Live Science in an interview.

The carving was originally created for the temple of Queen Tiye — Akhenaten's mother — who may have been alive when the defacement occurred. Even so, Francigny stressed that the desecration of the carving wasn't targeted against Akhenaten's own mom.

Wednesday, July 23, 2014

Wednesday Weekly # 43

Welcome to the Wednesday Weekly, your weekly dose of links to Egyptology news, articles, blogs, events and more!


POPULAR ARCHAEOLOGY


Archaeologists Uncover Lost Population of Ancient Amarna

http://popular-archaeology.com/issue/06052014/article/archaeologists-uncover-lost-population-of-ancient-amarna

THE ANCIENT WORLD ONLINE


Open Access Journal: Birmingham Egyptology Journal
http://ancientworldonline.blogspot.nl/2013/02/coming-soon-birmingham-egyptology-journa.html

HAIR AND DEATH IN ANCIENT EGYPT

by María Rosa Valdesogo:


Hair in Egyptian Art for Respect and Reverence in Women.
http://hairanddeathinancientegypt.com/2014/07/17/hair-in-egyptian-art-for-respect-and-reverence-in-women/

IN THE ARTIFACT LAB

New post by Molly Gleeson:

Wood ID
http://www.penn.museum/sites/artifactlab/2014/07/16/wood-id/

AL-AHRAM WEEKLY

By David Tresilian:

Myths of Cleopatra
http://weekly.ahram.org.eg/News/6808/23/Myths-of-Cleopatra.aspx

TETISHERI

New post by Julia Thorne:

Opening day at the refurbished Garstang Museum
http://www.tetisheri.co.uk/blog/opening-day-at-the-refurbished-garstang-museum

PASTHORIZONS

70,000 Year-old African settlement unearthed
http://www.pasthorizonspr.com/index.php/archives/07/2014/70000-year-old-african-settlement-unearthed

TT184

International Conference - Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest 17th–19th July 2014
http://tt184en.blogspot.nl/2014/07/international-conference-museum-of-fine.html

DR. GARRY SHAW

Bolton Museum makes bid for £1.8m Egyptology wing
http://garryshawegypt.blogspot.co.uk/2014/07/bolton-museum-makes-bid-for-18m.html

BBC NEWS

Northampton Museum's Sekhemka statue in private hands
http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-northamptonshire-28428637

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM

Discovering Tutankhamun
http://www.ashmolean.org/exhibitions/discovertut/

THE ART NEWSPAPER

By Martin Bailey:

Ashmolean exhibition reveals the real curse of Tutankhamun
http://www.theartnewspaper.com/articles/Ashmolean-exhibition-reveals-the-real-curse-of-Tutankhamun/33322

IAE INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION  OF EGYPTOLOGISTS

INTERNATIONAL CONGRESS OF EGYPTOLOGISTS XI: FLORENCE, ITALY, AUGUST 23–30, 2015
http://www.iae-egyptology.org/

THE ATKINSON

Egyptians Brought Back to Life at The Atkinson
http://www.theatkinson.co.uk/2014/07/egyptians-brought-back-to-life-at-the-atkinson/


Monday, July 21, 2014

Archaeologists Uncover Lost Population of Ancient Amarna

Burial remains shed new light on the "missing 6,000" of ancient Egypt's Amarna period.

It remained a mystery for decades.

Since archaeologist F.Ll. Griffith's excavations in the 1920's at the ancient site of the pharaoh Akhenaten's short-lived new capital city of Akhetaten (modern Amarna), archaeologists have been puzzled about the whereabouts of the remains of the city's commoner population – the people who toiled to build and maintain Akhenaten’s sacred edifices and infrastructure -- and more specifically, the estimated 6,000 people who died during the short 15-year period of the city’s construction and development.

“A will-of-the-wisp, the dream of a rich unplundered cemetery of the middle classes at El-Amarneh, full of choice vases and amulets, beckons to each successive explorer,” wrote Griffith in the report for his 1923 excavation season.*

Many of the elaborate unfinished rock-cut tombs of Akhenaten’s elite courtiers and high officials had already been found. They grace the cliff faces of the northern end of the Amarna city plain and the face of a low escarpment at the southern end of the ancient city. They can be plainly seen today by modern visitors.

But the burials of the deceased of the estimated 30,000 commoners and laborers remained elusive – until 2001, when archaeologist Barry Kemp of the University of Cambridge began to see the first signs. Kemp has directed excavations and surveys at Amarna for the Egypt Exploration Society since 1977.

Friday, July 18, 2014

Myths of Cleopatra

A French exhibition is revisiting the story of the ancient Egyptian queen Cleopatra, writes David Tresilian in Paris

Visitors to the French capital this summer have the opportunity to revisit what is known about the ancient Egyptian queen Cleopatra courtesy of an exhibition, The Myth of Cleopatra, at the Pinacothèque de Paris in the place de la Madeleine.

Bringing together material evidence from mostly European collections, the exhibition also examines Cleopatra’s afterlife in painting, literature and film. While no new discoveries are on offer, one leaves the show feeling reinvigorated and with interest in the ancient Egyptian queen renewed.

It can never be known what truly lies behind the stories of Cleopatra that have come down from antiquity, but the ancient writers are at one in suggesting that had it not been for Cleopatra’s influence over the Roman generals Julius Caesar and Mark Antony, the most powerful men in the world at the time, Egypt would have lost its independence far earlier than it did. As it was, the country was only annexed by Octavius Caesar after Cleopatra’s military defeat and suicide in 30 BCE.

Whatever else she was, these writers suggest, Cleopatra was supremely clever and a consummate politician. Though the seventeenth-century French writer Blaise Pascal later famously suggested that “had Cleopatra’s nose been shorter, the face of the world would have changed,” it seems that Cleopatra’s fascination lay less in her physical beauty and more in her quickness, intelligence and cultivation.