Wednesday, July 23, 2014

Wednesday Weekly # 43

Welcome to the Wednesday Weekly, your weekly dose of links to Egyptology news, articles, blogs, events and more!


POPULAR ARCHAEOLOGY


Archaeologists Uncover Lost Population of Ancient Amarna

http://popular-archaeology.com/issue/06052014/article/archaeologists-uncover-lost-population-of-ancient-amarna

THE ANCIENT WORLD ONLINE


Open Access Journal: Birmingham Egyptology Journal
http://ancientworldonline.blogspot.nl/2013/02/coming-soon-birmingham-egyptology-journa.html

HAIR AND DEATH IN ANCIENT EGYPT

by María Rosa Valdesogo:


Hair in Egyptian Art for Respect and Reverence in Women.
http://hairanddeathinancientegypt.com/2014/07/17/hair-in-egyptian-art-for-respect-and-reverence-in-women/

IN THE ARTIFACT LAB

New post by Molly Gleeson:

Wood ID
http://www.penn.museum/sites/artifactlab/2014/07/16/wood-id/

AL-AHRAM WEEKLY

By David Tresilian:

Myths of Cleopatra
http://weekly.ahram.org.eg/News/6808/23/Myths-of-Cleopatra.aspx

TETISHERI

New post by Julia Thorne:

Opening day at the refurbished Garstang Museum
http://www.tetisheri.co.uk/blog/opening-day-at-the-refurbished-garstang-museum

PASTHORIZONS

70,000 Year-old African settlement unearthed
http://www.pasthorizonspr.com/index.php/archives/07/2014/70000-year-old-african-settlement-unearthed

TT184

International Conference - Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest 17th–19th July 2014
http://tt184en.blogspot.nl/2014/07/international-conference-museum-of-fine.html

DR. GARRY SHAW

Bolton Museum makes bid for £1.8m Egyptology wing
http://garryshawegypt.blogspot.co.uk/2014/07/bolton-museum-makes-bid-for-18m.html

BBC NEWS

Northampton Museum's Sekhemka statue in private hands
http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-northamptonshire-28428637

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM

Discovering Tutankhamun
http://www.ashmolean.org/exhibitions/discovertut/

THE ART NEWSPAPER

By Martin Bailey:

Ashmolean exhibition reveals the real curse of Tutankhamun
http://www.theartnewspaper.com/articles/Ashmolean-exhibition-reveals-the-real-curse-of-Tutankhamun/33322

IAE INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION  OF EGYPTOLOGISTS

INTERNATIONAL CONGRESS OF EGYPTOLOGISTS XI: FLORENCE, ITALY, AUGUST 23–30, 2015
http://www.iae-egyptology.org/

THE ATKINSON

Egyptians Brought Back to Life at The Atkinson
http://www.theatkinson.co.uk/2014/07/egyptians-brought-back-to-life-at-the-atkinson/


Monday, July 21, 2014

Archaeologists Uncover Lost Population of Ancient Amarna

Burial remains shed new light on the "missing 6,000" of ancient Egypt's Amarna period.

It remained a mystery for decades.

Since archaeologist F.Ll. Griffith's excavations in the 1920's at the ancient site of the pharaoh Akhenaten's short-lived new capital city of Akhetaten (modern Amarna), archaeologists have been puzzled about the whereabouts of the remains of the city's commoner population – the people who toiled to build and maintain Akhenaten’s sacred edifices and infrastructure -- and more specifically, the estimated 6,000 people who died during the short 15-year period of the city’s construction and development.

“A will-of-the-wisp, the dream of a rich unplundered cemetery of the middle classes at El-Amarneh, full of choice vases and amulets, beckons to each successive explorer,” wrote Griffith in the report for his 1923 excavation season.*

Many of the elaborate unfinished rock-cut tombs of Akhenaten’s elite courtiers and high officials had already been found. They grace the cliff faces of the northern end of the Amarna city plain and the face of a low escarpment at the southern end of the ancient city. They can be plainly seen today by modern visitors.

But the burials of the deceased of the estimated 30,000 commoners and laborers remained elusive – until 2001, when archaeologist Barry Kemp of the University of Cambridge began to see the first signs. Kemp has directed excavations and surveys at Amarna for the Egypt Exploration Society since 1977.

Friday, July 18, 2014

Myths of Cleopatra

A French exhibition is revisiting the story of the ancient Egyptian queen Cleopatra, writes David Tresilian in Paris

Visitors to the French capital this summer have the opportunity to revisit what is known about the ancient Egyptian queen Cleopatra courtesy of an exhibition, The Myth of Cleopatra, at the Pinacothèque de Paris in the place de la Madeleine.

Bringing together material evidence from mostly European collections, the exhibition also examines Cleopatra’s afterlife in painting, literature and film. While no new discoveries are on offer, one leaves the show feeling reinvigorated and with interest in the ancient Egyptian queen renewed.

It can never be known what truly lies behind the stories of Cleopatra that have come down from antiquity, but the ancient writers are at one in suggesting that had it not been for Cleopatra’s influence over the Roman generals Julius Caesar and Mark Antony, the most powerful men in the world at the time, Egypt would have lost its independence far earlier than it did. As it was, the country was only annexed by Octavius Caesar after Cleopatra’s military defeat and suicide in 30 BCE.

Whatever else she was, these writers suggest, Cleopatra was supremely clever and a consummate politician. Though the seventeenth-century French writer Blaise Pascal later famously suggested that “had Cleopatra’s nose been shorter, the face of the world would have changed,” it seems that Cleopatra’s fascination lay less in her physical beauty and more in her quickness, intelligence and cultivation.

Wednesday, July 16, 2014

Wednesday Weekly # 42

Welcome to the Wednesday Weekly, your weekly dose of links to Egyptology news, articles, blogs, events and more!


THE INDEPENDENT

Saharan remains may be evidence of first race war, 13,000 years ago
http://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/archaeology/saharan-remains-may-be-evidence-of-first-race-war-13000-years-ago-9603632.html

THE ANCIENT WORLD ONLINE

The Digital Topographical Bibliography of Ancient Egyptian Hieroglyphic Texts, Statues, Reliefs, and Paintings
http://ancientworldonline.blogspot.nl/2014/07/the-digital-topographical-bibliography.html

Checklist of Editions of Greek, Latin, Demotic, and Coptic Papyri, Ostraca, and Tablets
http://ancientworldonline.blogspot.nl/2014/07/checklist-of-editions-of-greek-latin.html

(Partially) Open Access Series: Oxyrhynchus Papyri 1-15
http://ancientworldonline.blogspot.nl/2010/06/open-access-oxyrhynchus-papyri.html

EGYPT AT THE MANCHESTER MUSEUM

An intern’s perspective: Cataloguing Egypt at Manchester Museum
http://egyptmanchester.wordpress.com/2014/07/11/an-interns-perspective-cataloguing-egypt-at-manchester-museum/

HAIR AND DEATH IN ANCIENT EGYPT

by María Rosa Valdesogo:


Hair in Egyptian Art for Expressing Respect.
http://hairanddeathinancientegypt.com/2014/07/10/hair-in-egyptian-art-for-expressing-respect/

THE BRITISH MUSEUM BLOG

By Renée Friedman, curator, British Museum:

Violence and climate change in prehistoric Egypt and Sudan
http://blog.britishmuseum.org/2014/07/14/violence-and-climate-change-in-prehistoric-egypt-and-sudan/

AHRAM ONLINE

By Amer Sultan:


Northampton and Christie’s insist on Sekhemka sale, claim Egypt approves 
http://english.ahram.org.eg/NewsContent/9/40/105829/Heritage/Ancient-Egypt/Northampton-and-Christie%E2%80%99s-insist-on-Sekhemka-sale.aspx

Ancient Egyptian statue sells for £16 million in UK despite outcry
http://english.ahram.org.eg/NewsContent/9/40/105963/Heritage/Ancient-Egypt/Ancient-Egyptian-statue-sells-for-%C2%A3-million-in-UK-.aspx

By Nevine El-Aref:

Islamic, pharaonic items returned to Egypt from Denmark and France
http://english.ahram.org.eg/NewsContent/9/43/105941/Heritage/Islamic/Islamic,-pharaonic-items-returned-to-Egypt-from-De.aspx

DAILY NEWS EGYPT

By Nadia Ismail:

The business of death

Book review: “Mrs Tsenhor: A Female Entrepreneur in Ancient Egypt”, by Koenraad Donker van Heel
http://www.dailynewsegypt.com/2014/07/09/business-death/

EGYPTOLOGICAL

By Kate Phizackerley:

Queen Duathathor-Henuttawy (21st Dynasty), Wife of King Pinedjem I
http://egyptological.com/2014/07/08/henuttawy-12191

ANCIENT EGYPT AND A MAPLE LEAF

New post by Thomas H. Greiner:

Crisis at Christie’s: the Sale of the Statue of Sekhemka and its Implications on Cultural Heritage
http://thomasgreiner.com/2014/07/10/crisis-at-christies-the-sale-of-the-statue-of-sekhemka-and-its-implications-on-cultural-heritage/

ANCIENT EGYPTIAN ANIMAL BIO BANK

National Mummy Week
http://ancientegyptbiobank.wordpress.com/2014/07/10/national-mummy-week/

DAILY MAIL ONLINE

The car boot bargain that turned out to be TREASURE: £3 tool revealed as 4,500-year-old ancient Egyptian hammer - and it could fetch up to £4,000
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2691573/The-car-boot-bargain-turned-TREASURE-3-tool-revealed-4-500-year-old-ancient-Egyptian-hammer-fetch-4-000.html

ACROSSBORDERS

New post by Julia Budka:

The long-lasting ceramic tradition on Sai Island
http://acrossborders.oeaw.ac.at/the-long-lasting-ceramic-tradition-on-sai-island/

KRISTIAN STRUTT

Blog Catch-up #1: Archaeology and Survey in the Nile Delta at Naukratis
http://kdstrutt.wordpress.com/2014/07/15/blog-catch-up-1-archaeology-and-survey-in-the-nile-delta-at-naukratis/

MIKE PITTS - DIGGING DEEPER

Six things about Sekhemka
http://mikepitts.wordpress.com/2014/07/13/six-things-about-sekhemka/

SOUTH ASASIF CONSERVATION PROJECT BLOG

Blog Post 6: A Conservator’s Perspective
http://southasasif.wordpress.com/2014/07/09/blog-post-6-a-conservators-perspective/

MEDICINE AND MAGIC IN ANCIENT EGYPT

By Sofia Lodi:


Medicinal Uses of the Castor Bean Plant (Ricinus Communis)
http://nefertotsie.blogspot.nl/2014/07/medicinal-uses-of-castor-bean-plant.html

DAY OF ARCHAEOLOGY

A Day of archaeology in Assasif (Luxor)
http://www.dayofarchaeology.com/a-day-of-archaeology-in-assasif-luxor/

Presenting Archaeology: The Museum curator
http://www.dayofarchaeology.com/present-ing-archaeology-the-museum-curator/

The Foreign Archaeology Collection at Bristol Museum
http://www.dayofarchaeology.com/the-foreign-archaeology-collection-at-bristol-museum/

LIVESCIENCE

By Owen Jarus:

Ancient Priest's Tomb Painting Discovered Near Great Pyramid at Giza
http://www.livescience.com/46806-tomb-painting-discovered-near-great-pyramid.html



Tuesday, July 15, 2014

The business of death

Book review: “Mrs Tsenhor: A Female Entrepreneur in Ancient Egypt”, by Koenraad Donker van Heel

By Nadia Ismail

Death was big business to the Ancient Egyptians, with their tombs and reliquaries also providing some of the best information on their life and culture. In the intriguing new book, “Mrs Tsenhor: A Female Entrepreneur in Ancient Egypt”, Koenraad Donker van Heel introduces readers to Tsenhor, “sister of Horus”, a strongly spoken and highly independent working woman who made her fortune through the industry of death.

Born in 550 BCE in Karnak, Tsenhor is described as one of a family of chaochytes, hired to bring offerings on behalf of families to the dead in their tombs on the west bank of the Nile. Tsenhor inherited her work from her father, Nesmin, and continued this work alongside her second husband, whom she is described as having married on equal terms.

In exchange for her work, Tsenhor received food items, high quality farm land, foods amongst other things. Such was the demand for the services of chaochytes like Tsenhor, that she amassed not only a house that she could afford to restructure, but she also owned at least one slave and amassed an array of assets to her name. All this was done with little male input.

However, with a good chunk of surviving evidence, either unclear or written in a form of hieroglyphs that only a few Egyptologists can understand, van Heel has a tough job of creating a solid story around Tsenhor.

Monday, July 14, 2014

Saharan remains may be evidence of first race war, 13,000 years ago

Scientists are investigating what may be the oldest identified race war 13,000 years after it raged on the fringes of the Sahara.

French scientists working in collaboration with the British Museum have been examining dozens of skeletons, a majority of whom appear to have been killed by archers using flint-tipped arrows.

The bones – from Jebel Sahaba on the east bank of the Nile in northern Sudan – are from victims of the world’s oldest known relatively large-scale human armed conflict.

Over the past two years anthropologists from Bordeaux University have discovered literally dozens of previously undetected arrow impact marks and flint arrow head fragments on and around the bones of the victims.

This is in addition to many arrow heads and impact marks already found embedded in some of the bones during an earlier examination of the skeletons back in the 1960s. The remains – the contents of an entire early cemetery – were found in 1964 by the prominent American archaeologist, Fred Wendorf, but, until the current investigations, had  never been examined using more modern, 21 century, technology.

Some of the skeletal material has just gone on permanent display as part of the British Museum’s new Early Egypt gallery which opens officially today. The bones – from Jebel Sahaba on the east bank of the River Nile in northern Sudan – are from victims of the world’s oldest known relatively large-scale human armed conflict.

Sunday, July 13, 2014

Museum Pieces - Papyrus with a winged deity

Papyrus with a winged deity

The strange winged creature standing in front of the serpent in this scene represents several destructive forces, good and bad, inherent in various Egyptian gods. These powers were not normally represented in specific shapes; hence, the unusual being here, like the winged figure in the large stone relief also in this case, is not a single god but a representation of several abstractions. The god Bes was one of the deities associated with this composite being; as a guardian of women and children, he acquired the role of protector of the birth of kings and of the sun, which sprang forth anew each morning from the underworld, where it had been threatened by snakes during the night. The images of the child and the snake on the papyrus reflect these concepts.

Medium: Papyrus, ink
Possible Place Made: Heliopolis, Egypt
Dates: 7th - 4th century B.C.E.
Period: Late Period
Accession Number: 47.218.156a-d
Credit Line: Bequest of Theodora Wilbour from the collection of her father, Charles Edwin Wilbour
Rights Statement: No known copyright restrictions
Caption: Papyrus, 7th - 4th century B.C.E. Papyrus, ink, a: Glass: 7 1/2 x 26 3/8 in. (19 x 67 cm). Brooklyn Museum, Bequest of Theodora Wilbour from the collection of her father, Charles Edwin Wilbour, 47.218.156a-d
Image: detail, 47.218.156a-c_detail_SL3.jpg. Brooklyn Museum photograph
Catalogue Description: Hieratic script

Source:

http://www.brooklynmuseum.org/opencollection/objects/60794/Papyrus